Was 9/11 an Inside Job as Pearl Harbor in 1941?



Do you think the 9/11 Conspiracy to go to 2 wars is a new thing for the United States of America? Wrong! This has happened before to go to World War 2. Pearl Harbor was an inside job.




Consecuences? Well Watch this video below




Why did the United States drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima? Was it necessary? Were the American people told the truth? What about today? How much do we really know about the U.S., Russia, Iran, Israel, and China and their nuclear weapons?








On December 7th 1941 the Japanese attacked on Pearl Harbor during the World War II.






On November 25, 1941 Japans Admiral Yamamoto sent a radio message to the group of Japanese warships that would attack Pearl Harbor on December 7. Newly released naval records prove that from November 17 to 25 the United States Navy intercepted eighty-three messages that Yamamoto sent to his carriers. Part of the November 25 message read: ...the task force, keeping its movements strictly secret and maintaining close guard against submarines and aircraft, shall advance into Hawaiian waters, and upon the very opening of hostilities shall attack the main force of the United States fleet in Hawaii and deal it a mortal blow...

One might wonder if the theory that President Franklin Roosevelt had a foreknowledge of the Pearl Harbor attack would have been alluded to in this summers movie, Pearl Harbor. Since World War II many people have suspected that Washington knew the attack was coming. When Thomas Dewey was running for president against Roosevelt in 1944 he found out about Americas ability to intercept Japans radio messages, and thought this knowledge would enable him to defeat the popular FDR. In the fall of that year, Dewey planned a series of speeches charging FDR with foreknowledge of the attack. Ultimately, General George Marshall, then Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, persuaded Dewey not to make the speeches. Japans naval leaders did not realize America had cracked their codes, and Deweys speeches could have sacrificed Americas code-breaking advantage. So, Dewey said nothing, and in November FDR was elected president for the fourth time.


Now, though, according to Robert Stinnett, author of Simon & Schusters Day Of Deceit, we have the proof. Stinnetts book is dedicated to Congressman John Moss, the author of Americas Freedom of Information Act. According to Stinnett, the answers to the mysteries of Pearl Harbor can be found in the extraordinary number of documents he was able to attain through Freedom of Information Act requests. Cable after cable of decryptions, scores of military messages that America was intercepting, clearly showed that Japanese ships were preparing for war and heading straight for Hawaii. Stinnett, an author, journalist, and World War II veteran, spent sixteen years delving into the National Archives. He poured over more than 200,000 documents, and conducted dozens of interviews. This meticulous research led Stinnet to a firmly held conclusion: FDR knew.

Your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars, was Roosevelts famous campaign statement of 1940. He wasnt being ingenuous. FDRs military and State Department leaders were agreeing that a victorious Nazi Germany would threaten the national security of the United States. In White House meetings the strong feeling was that America needed a call to action. This is not what the public wanted, though. Eighty to ninety percent of the American people wanted nothing to do with Europes war. So, according to Stinnett, Roosevelt provoked Japan to attack us, let it happen at Pearl Harbor, and thus galvanized the country to war. Many who came into contact with Roosevelt during that time hinted that FDR wasnt being forthright about his intentions in Europe. After the attack, on the Sunday evening of December 7, 1941, Roosevelt had a brief meeting in the White House with Edward R. Murrow, the famed journalist, and William Donovan, the founder of the Office of Strategic Services. Later Donovan told an assistant that he believed FDR welcomed the attack and didnt seem surprised. The only thing Roosevelt seemed to care about, Donovan felt, was if the public would now support a declaration of war. According to Day Of Deceit, in October 1940 FDR adopted a specific strategy to incite Japan to commit an overt act of war. Part of the strategy was to move Americas Pacific fleet out of California and anchor it in Pearl Harbor. Admiral James Richardson, the commander of the Pacific fleet, strongly opposed keeping the ships in harms way in Hawaii. He expressed this to Roosevelt, and so the President relieved him of his command. Later Richardson quoted Roosevelt as saying: Sooner or later the Japanese will commit an overt act against the United States and the nation will be willing to enter the war.



To those who believe that government conspiracies cant possibly happen, Day Of Deceit could prove to them otherwise. Stinnetts well-documented book makes a convincing case that the highest officials of the government—including the highest official—fooled and deceived millions of Americans about one of the most important days in the history of the country.

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